Homeschooling High School Electives

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Homeschooling High School Electives

Homeschooling High School Electives when you don’t know everything.

Have you been faced with the problem of your child wanting to learn a subject that you know nothing about?  Both Confessions of a Homeschooler and The Pioneer Woman offer alternatives on what to do.

I have used co-ops, on-line sources, and local colleges to help my children learn things like chemistry and English in our homeschool. For the first time in my homeschooling high school electives, we are changing roles.

Over the past 13 years of homeschooling, my kid’s choices of subjects have really stretched me. I never dreamed I would dabble with Latin, grade pre-calculus, or sign praise songs at church.

This school year my daughter and her friend have really taken an interest in Greek history. They requested learning the Greek language. They want to study mythology along with their (affiliate link) Mystery of History.

I gathered a pile of books on the subjects and thought I had a plan to begin our studies. We met for our first co-op class and after about 15 minutes of listening to the girls I realized they had already passed my knowledge of the subject matter.

I had purchased Famous Men of Greece and after reading the first lesson the girls wanted to know why “A book titled Famous Men of Greece would use the Roman names of the Gods and Goddesses in the lessons.” I learned quickly they had strong opinions about this topic.

I suggested creating a family tree of the god’s and goddesses. They immediately started firing questions about just the 12 major or including the minor gods. I couldn’t tell whom the gods were from the real people who did live during the same time period.

I finally looked at both of them and suggested they become the teachers and I the student. I would allow them to meet on Wednesdays to plan what we would do in co-op on Thursdays. They were beyond excited to give this a try.

I quickly gave them some guidelines on writing a course plan.

Homeschooling High School Electives Taught by the Students

  • How many weeks would the co-op meet?
  • Start and end dates need to be established.
  • How many credits are being earned?
  • Who would be responsible for:
  1. Book Lists
  2. Hand-on Activities
  3. Projects
  4. Tests
  5. Field Trips
  6. Weekly teaching

They now have 2 months to plan our Greek Mythology co-op. Currently I am their only student. I am little nervous about passing the class. I heard a rumor they want me to write a 2 page paper, I guess blog writing doesn’t count in this class.

Have you ever allowed your homeschool students to teach a class for credit?

I plan on awarding them credit based on hours logged with this assignment. I think 1/2 credit for Greek Mythology and hours toward their 1/4 credit in Occupational Education with Home School High School and Beyond.

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This post may contain AFFILIATE LINKS. Clicking through these links help to support the costs involved in running this blog and sometimes can help with other expenses. You can find my full disclosure under the DISCLOSURE TAB. Thanks!

Comments

  1. Kristen says:

    Love, love, love it! So creative. I can’t wait to see future posts on how this turned out. You are going to read the required books, right? :).

  2. Mary says:

    Your blog is new to me – off to check it out! I saw your link up on The Daisy Head.

  3. Love this idea! So fun! They will learn waaaaay more if they have to teach it than if someone else taught the course. What a fabulous idea!

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